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Discover more about the New Forest's history, wildlife and landscape with videos, photos and articles.

Discover the unique New Forest

With its remarkable range of plants and animals, ancient tradition of commoning, varied history and distinctive local communities, the New Forest National Park is unique. Whether you’re a long term resident or a first time visitor, we'll help you discover fascinating facts about the Forest, its people and wildlife.
Bats

Bats

Butterflies

Butterflies

Wading birds

Wading birds

Deer

Deer

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Email

Newsletter

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Natural Beauty

The landscape of the New Forest National Park is beautiful, rare and fragile.

Beech

Beech

Rowan (Mountain Ash)

Rowan (Mountain Ash)

Blackthorn sloe

Blackthorn sloe

Ash

Ash

Plants and fungi

Slime moulds

Each autumn, single celled-organisms combine to form slime...

Plants and fungi

Fungi

The New Forest is a special and nationally-important...

Plants and fungi

The New Forest's plants and fungi are one of the reasons this area receives extra protection as a National Park. From devil’s finger to butcher's broom, petty whin to wood spurge – the Forest is full of unusual plants and fungi with intriguing names. Use this section to find out more about them, including how you can help protect them and handy ID tips.

History and culture

Since its creation by William the Conqueror around 1079 for the pursuit of the ‘beasts of the chase’ – red, roe and fallow deer and wild pig – many historical events and influences have shaped the landscape and cultural heritage of the New Forest. This section chronicles this varied past, tells the story of some of the Forest’s most famous people and places and shines a light on its characterful buildings.

Commoning

Commoning and the Forest

Commoning makes a positive contribution to the remarkable...

Commoning

Commoning and you

In this section you can find out more...

Commoning

Grazing by commoners’ animals still shapes and maintains the New Forest we all know and enjoy, making it accessible and very special. Although common rights were once widespread in Britain and Europe, they have been lost in many areas due to the enclosure of common land and the demise of former royal forests. The New Forest remains one of the few extensive lowland commons where rights are still widely practised and a strong commoning culture continues. This section tells the story of commoning, from the animals and rights to the commoners themselves and their close-knit community.

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